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The Newsroom - Season 3



The Newsroom is an American television drama series created by Aaron Sorkin, which premiered on the premium cable network HBO on June 24, 2012.[1] The series concluded on December 14, 2014,[2] and consists of 25 episodes over three seasons.




The Newsroom - Season 3



The Newsroom aired its final season in 2014 after 3 years, with the final season being I think the weakest due to the episode count and change in tone. This show was very well received by me, if not others as a whole, but with season 1 and 2 being a show that I enjoyed immensely. (I have not seen any of Sorkins other tv shows). But in this final season while the idea was interesting and the motivations of the characters as a whole shifting over time, I think the show ended quite poorly. Between the manner in which the network is sold, the deaths, the change in storytelling and the somewhat abrupt ending to the show, I think the show maybe would have been better served with ending in the 2nd season, or with at least a different wrap up / storyline this time around. As a whole though, the show was exceptional to me and something that I greatly enjoyed, with likeable characters, strong cast, interesting plot points and motivations that could be understood by everyone who watched the show. But what made the final season something that was unliked by me, considering the high praise I gave the show previously?;


After finally have the network sold, and the new buyer coming in, as expected he begins to change everything that they had been working on. Then without a proper understanding, we are thrust 55 days or so into the future, and it seems that Charlie just no longer cares about the adjustments that have been made to the network. He no longer fights with the new buyer, nor is he helping out his employees, he gives them tasks to accomplish and goes crazy when they either are non-compliant or unable to complete the task. This is despite the belief that we have built up over the 2 seasons previous that Charlie agrees with how they are portraying the news and that he was a driving force behind it (As shown in the finale), causing a severe disconnect between who we have come to know and who we see now.


Sorkin said at the beginning of this season that he was "just now starting to learn how to write" The Newsroom. And whether Sorkin intended it or not, Don's discussion with Sloan is a perfect statement of what the show was really about. Anchor Will McAvoy (Jeff Daniels) may have declared himself on a "mission to civilize" during the first season of The Newsroom, with women as his particular targets. But neither he nor Sorkin ever really wanted that quest, with its whiff of pith-helmeted colonialism and Don Quixote's tilting at windmills, to succeed. The problem with lecturing everyone else on how they're living wrong is that if they listen and learn, you have no one left to feel superior to.


They lectured rather than organized. They produced a program that drove "News Night" from second in the ratings when The Newsroom began to last in its final season. Charlie Skinner (Sam Waterston) was right to be incensed when his staff responded to Lucas Pruit's (B.J. Novak) orders to broadcast garbage by either surrendering or committing career suicide. After all, we learned that he had wooed MacKenzie McHale (Emily Mortimer) to run Will's show by telling her "Take the offer and you'll have a chance to frame the debate. Or pass. But then you never get to complain about the news again."


Sorkin said at the beginning of this season that he was \\\"just now starting to learn how to write\\\" The Newsroom. And whether Sorkin intended it or not, Don's discussion with Sloan is a perfect statement of what the show was really about. Anchor Will McAvoy (Jeff Daniels) may have declared himself on a \\\"mission to civilize\\\" during the first season of The Newsroom, with women as his particular targets. But neither he nor Sorkin ever really wanted that quest, with its whiff of pith-helmeted colonialism and Don Quixote's tilting at windmills, to succeed. The problem with lecturing everyone else on how they're living wrong is that if they listen and learn, you have no one left to feel superior to.


They lectured rather than organized. They produced a program that drove \\\"News Night\\\" from second in the ratings when The Newsroom began to last in its final season. Charlie Skinner (Sam Waterston) was right to be incensed when his staff responded to Lucas Pruit's (B.J. Novak) orders to broadcast garbage by either surrendering or committing career suicide. After all, we learned that he had wooed MacKenzie McHale (Emily Mortimer) to run Will's show by telling her \\\"Take the offer and you'll have a chance to frame the debate. Or pass. But then you never get to complain about the news again.\\\"


Wow!..just wow! Hauntingly beautiful rendition of this song. Like many others, watching the newsroom has led me here and, while im sure you probably dont get many hardcore dance producers commenting, my wife, who passed away a couple of years ago, loved this song and im sure would adore, as i do, your version of it. Much love & respect to you :)


There are six episodes in The Newsroom season three. Each episode lasts 60 minutes on average. You can check the complete list of The Newsroom episodes and their scheduled date release here below.


The Newsroom received a 91% from audience viewers. Almost all audience reviews are positive, with the acting, writing, and plots highly rated. Viewers also enjoyed the witty banter mixed in with the more dramatic moments. Overall, the biggest complaint was that the show ended after only three seasons.


When The Newsroom earned a third season, it seemed like a sure sign that the show was here to stay. But earlier today, when HBO officially confirmed its season 3 renewal, it also announced that it would be its final season. Like so many Aaron Sorkin shows before it - Sports Nights, Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip - The Newsroom appears to have worn out its welcome.


Centering on Will McAvoy (Jeff Daniels) - a lead anchorman for the fictional ACN - and his staff as they struggle to produce a nightly news show amid political, social and commercial pressures, The Newsroom had a steadily growing fanbase. After a rocky start, season 2 of the series was generally better reviewed and it earned higher ratings than season 1. On top of that, Daniels took home the Emmy for Best Lead Actor in a Drama last year.


So, why the cancellation when the series was just beginning to pick up speed? Season 2's production issues and the difficult negotiations between HBO and Sorkin over season 3 (which caused the initial delay in renewal) might be the cause. Season 2 was reduced from 10 episodes to only nine after what Sorkin referred to as a "false start," according to THR. This led to costly reshoots and delays in filming, and subsequently, Patton Oswalt's role was cut from season 2 altogether.


The episode began with the newsroom on edge -- and perhaps dropping more f-bombs than in the whole rest of the series -- as the FBI continued to confiscate hard drives and ask about Neal. However, after Charlie (Sam Waterston) and Mackenzie (Emily Mortimer) threatened to broadcast the raid, the FBI gave ACN a week to identify the source and let a judge decide if issues involving national security were involved.


All of this brings us to show runner Aaron Sorkin, whose current brain child, The Newsroom, is likely going to be picked up for a third season. The show examines the lives of the people who work at Atlantis Cable News (or ACN, a fictitious major news outlet) and its flagship news broadcast News Night.


For those who have watched even a single episode of Sorkin's four seasons of the transcendent West Wing (and the three very good seasons that followed), watching The Newsroom is a little bit like being awake for an amputation of one of your own limbs. You hope it's going to work out, but your world-class surgeon decided to show up high to work.


Of course, The Newsroom creator would know all about that last part. The West Wing lasted for seven seasons, but Sorkin was unceremoniously axed as a show-runner after he was forced to admit that he had been using cocaine while lording over NBC's new marquee show.


In his post-Newsroom commentaries Sorkin has stated that the purpose of all of the excessive inter-personal turmoil has been building towards season 2. Specifically, how all of these ridiculous things would make ACN look when presented in the context of a very serious legal situation. Really? You needed to waste 15 hours of people's times to prove what The West Wing did in one episode?


Lowe, who was charming and in the midst of a career comeback, received top billing for the first two years, but eventually got too big for his britches and quit. Lowe's exit came at roughly the same time Sorkins' did, but the show's creator had laid such a clear blueprint for success that The West Wing continued for 3 more seasons without missing a beat.


What is most interesting about The Social Network is that it portrayed Mark Zuckerberg as a petulant child whose ambition was driven by insecurity. The second part is probably true, but like Zuckerburg, Sorkin may have revealed a little bit of his own petulance. The man responsible for writing A Few Good Men (on cocktail napkins no less) claims that he was affected by the criticism of The Newsroom's mediocre first season. If that is indeed the case, the shows' second season hasn't provided enough evidence to change the jury's minds.


On Episode 13 of Season 3 of the Securities Compliance Podcast: Compliance in Context, host Patrick D. Hayes is joined by Debbie Hennelly, founder of Resiliti and an expert on organizational resilience by creating cultures of integrity, innovation, and inclusion, to discuss how to handle the physical and mental parts of being a compliance officer. In the Headlines section, Patrick looks at the recently published SEC Enforcement numbers and reviews the recent rulemaking on the investment adviser oversight of service providers. Finally, Patrick wraps up the show with another installment of History Has Your Back, where he examines the life of Eve Ball and embracing a new perspective as we enter into the season of annual compliance reviews. 041b061a72


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